They Said What?

Home » Uncategorized » New research: Why wellness programs make some employees fatter

New research: Why wellness programs make some employees fatter

Do you know whether heartburn pills are safe for long-term use?

Quizzify knows. Click to learn more.

All this time, I just thought that:

  1. employees got worse in wellness programs because
  2. wellness vendors, especially their CEOs, are stupid. (“In wellness, stupid is the new broccoli.”)

Here’s an example that would seem to fit the hypothesis like a glove:

  1. Wellsteps caused employee health to seriously deteriorate and
  2. their CEO needed to spend “11 years in college.” That’s four more than Bluto Blutarski (though I think Mr. Aldana did at least manage to graduate, possibly without even throwing up on the dean). Yet when he accused award-winning health writer Sharon Begley of dishonesty because she quoted Wellsteps’ outcomes report verbatim, he called her a “lier.”

So I put two and two together and thought: “stupid vendor equals program failure.” Turns out it’s much more complex than that.


A study published in Frontiers in Psychology examined the relationship between weight and wellness programs, with three studies, summarized here in their own words.

The present research focuses on a downside of workplace health promotion programs that to date has not been examined before, namely the possibility that they, due to a focus on individual responsibility for one’s health, inadvertently facilitate stigmatization and discrimination of people with overweight in the workplace.

    • Study 1 shows that the presence of workplace health promotion programs is associated with increased attributions of weight controllability.
    • Study 2 experimentally demonstrates that workplace health promotion programs emphasizing individual rather than organizational responsibility elicit weight stigma.
    • Study 3, which was pre-registered, showed that workplace health promotion programs emphasizing individual responsibility induced weight-based discrimination in the context of promotion decisions in the workplace. Moreover, focusing on people with obesity who frequently experience weight stigma and discrimination,
    • Study 3 also showed that workplace health promotion programs highlighting individual responsibility induced employees with obesity to feel individually responsible for their health, but at the same time made them perceive weight as less controllable.

Together, our research identifies workplace health promotion programs as potent catalysts of weight stigma and weight-based discrimination, especially when they emphasize individual responsibility for health outcomes.

This explains an awful lot. First and most obviously, why people gained weight in the award-winning Wellsteps, McKesson, and Vitality programs. In wellness, I observed three years ago, “fat-shaming is the new black.”

Second, it explains the futility of one of the two positive (albeit trivial) findings in the recent BJ’s Wholesale Club study — that more employees will “watch their weight.” Study 3 suggests that’s a bug, not a feature.

Third, it explains the harms being visited upon people who already have eating disorders. Especially because Ron says employees should weigh themselves daily, which naturally is the opposite of what the science says and is downright dangerous for people with eating disorders.

Finally, it explains why Ron Goetzel will be spending his entire life trying to turn lead into gold (or in his case, claiming he already has, by giving Koop Awards to a bunch of failed programs which he calls successes). Sustained weight loss as a result of wellness programs stigmatizing obesity has never happened in the past, and there is no possibility — none, zero — that workplaces trying to coax, cajole, bribe, fine, or shame employees into losing weight will ever be successful in the future.

No wonder virtually every single wellness program fails.

 


5 Comments

  1. Mitch Collins says:

    Excellent. 

    Like

  2. drjonrobison says:

    A-Freakin-Men – Great piece! – Cannot wait to hear them defend this one – But then again there was Galileo! – Dr. Jon

    Like

    • whynobodybelievesthenumbers says:

      They never respond. The only thing that is more damaging to their business model than facts, arithmetic, data, analysis, and outcomes is a news cycle.

      Like

  3. JRStern says:

    Is Sharon Begley a health writer now, she was a general science writer last I looked – and a very good one.

    Like

In the immortal words of the great philosopher Pat Benatar, hit me with your best shot.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: